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 > Best way to patch fiberglass?

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Frankandbeans

VA

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Posted: 07/08/14 05:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here's what I got:

[image]

fcooper

St. Augustine, Florida

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Posted: 07/08/14 06:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yes, you can do this yourself.

Look at my roof repair in the link below. It was a little bigger than what you've got, and on a curved surface. The link has pictures and some limited instructions.

If you've never worked with fiberglass before, try to find someone to help you with the rosin mixing and the first layers. I'd try to put at least 3 layers of fiberglass on the back side with 3 more on the outside, and then grind it down smooth when cured. When you're trying to grind down the edges on the back side, a round sanding attachment for an electric drill with the pad and sandpaper mounted reversed (so the grit is facing you) can be inserted into the hole and used to grind the back side from the front side.

Helpful hints: Buy a batch of cheap disposable paint brushes about 1 to 1.5 inches wide. Buy a box of cheap rubber gloves. Apply the rosin with the disposable paint brush and throw away the brush. Wear the rubber gloves, and keep changing them after they get rosin on them. When grinding, wear long sleeves and a fan blowing the dust away from you will help. Buying several graduated mixing cups can be helpful also.

I like to buy the rosin and fiberglass cloth at a large boat supply house as it is a little cheaper than the kits at Walmart, but the kits (maybe about 2) will work for this.

Let us know how it turns out.

Here's the link:
Fiberglass Roof Repair

Fred


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Dirtclods

Newport Beach

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Posted: 07/11/14 02:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

WoW that's some work there! So if I were to repair it. I would mask off the area and make cut it out a square box using a router of a skill saw. Then you would need to fill the void with something so it would fall down. I would use hard Styrofoam as a backing then repair it using fiberglass as mention above. Or take it to a boat repair shop.

fly-boy

AZ or CA

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Posted: 07/11/14 02:42pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would repair it with glass but if you are concerned about doing it I have an easy fix-

Cut out around the damaged area and fill it with expandable foam so you keep H2O out. Sand it down as flat as you can.

Then buy a 4x8 foot piece of 0.020 matte aluminum sheet with an adhesive laminate on it. Have the metal cut to run entirely across the ramp and cover the hole. It should look just fine and you will be good to go!

If you need the aluminum- PM me. I can cut and ship a sheet with the adhesive already applied so all you have to do is peel and stick.


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Frankandbeans

VA

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Posted: 08/21/14 09:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Update: It's been patched.

Now the question is, which way to go about painting? Here's my dilemma: It's a 2005, it cleans up well, but it's not brand new either. Do I pay a shop to paint/gel coat it, knowing it's going to be near impossible to match the white anyways? Do I do a hack job with spray paint, knowing the white won't match perfect either, and just cover up with a sticker?

BigBlockTank

Tucson, AZ

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Posted: 08/21/14 11:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Frankandbeans wrote:

Wow...ok. So many options to choose from regarding what kind of fiberglass repair kit to use!

How about step 1 - What do you guys think of using the expanda foam as a way of having something for the fiber glass patch to stick to? I will take a picture of what I'm working with tonight so everyone can see what I'm trying to accomplish.

I AM going to fix this myself. I'm seeing a lot of similarities in RV's and sport bikes - it doesn't take much to total out these things. To be honest, it's not blue booking for a whole lot, and if I made an insurance claim to fix this and some other minor things (That aren't that big of a deal, but labor prices are insane), I'm willing to bet they could total it. I just want it to be water proof and as close to smooth as I can get it. I'll paint it with the classiest rattle can I can find, and call it good.


It's not that hard, I really don't care what anybody says. I've repaired mach3+ aircraft panels and they're still flying, or in a museum now hahaha.

I would say no on the expanding foam. Next, I would find out for sure what kind of resin was used to make the door. Next, there is a product for this kind of repair. It's like the above poster said, bondo type material, it's green and does have the fiber in it. It is the strongest I've found in 39 years. A good auto paint sore will have it, it's Evercoat Kitty Hair. Stronger than the Hulk (hahaha), really it is good.

Sand the door and surrounding area with some 36-60 grit to get ready. Mix up the kitty hair, and put it into the hole, as long as it's not a gapping hole that has no solids in it all the way around the hole. I mean there is enough material to keep the kitty hair from falling inside the door, and too deep. (kinda hard to tell with words and no pictures)

Be careful to not over fill, this kitty hair is a big bear to sand smooth. Fill it enough, but not over fill. Use an airfile to sand it down (auto body shop for about $100 or harbour freight for $50 maybe). For the last thin coat, regular body filler over 36-60 grit scratch marks will be ok, it'll stick.

Get it smooth, and spray some primer over the repair. Use a very flat board, plexiglass, t angle or any tool that is very flat and can put a piece of sand paper on it. If you do it by hand, you'll have all kinds of divets in it.

It should be smooth and ready to paint at this point.

BBTank

nayther

Burbank, CA

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Posted: 08/25/14 09:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'd repaint the whole tailgate, you won't match it


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PAThwacker

East Stroudsburg, PA

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Posted: 08/25/14 01:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I had a hole like that when my wife backed me I up with a popup. She was only looking at one side and failed to notice the woodpile boom. Insurance called $1400 repair. The shop removed rear panel and installed new part. I traded with damage, cursed out wife, cut 4 trees down, and do it solo!


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artguys

kemah tx

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Posted: 08/26/14 11:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Go to West Marine , Boat US or the like. Don't buy the more expensive Epoxy fix systems...lots more expensive and it adds a extra layer of steps. Anything epoxy requires a final finish to protect from UV issues, rather choose a polyester resin fix solution, and add a coloring agent...hence no need for the extra layers of finish,as polyester resins alone can stand up to uv issues. Get a patch kit with fiber mat then buy the resin and catalyst. Leave damaged area as is and simply fill in the void with available material such as cardboard etc. The final finish doesn't require a gel coat just a series of abrasives to finish with a 2000 wet dry and polish.

BigBlockTank

Tucson, AZ

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Posted: 08/26/14 02:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

artguys wrote:

Go to West Marine , Boat US or the like. Don't buy the more expensive Epoxy fix systems...lots more expensive and it adds a extra layer of steps. Anything epoxy requires a final finish to protect from UV issues, rather choose a polyester resin fix solution, and add a coloring agent...hence no need for the extra layers of finish,as polyester resins alone can stand up to uv issues. Get a patch kit with fiber mat then buy the resin and catalyst. Leave damaged area as is and simply fill in the void with available material such as cardboard etc. The final finish doesn't require a gel coat just a series of abrasives to finish with a 2000 wet dry and polish.


Help me follow along. Are you saying to patch any fiberglass with polyester, no matter what the original substrate is made from?

And, do you know what this particular door is made from?

Thanks in advance

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