Coast Resorts Open Roads Forum: Fifth-Wheels: Is exhaust brake really needed?
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 > Is exhaust brake really needed?

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cummins2014

Utah

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Posted: 03/01/14 10:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Atom Ant wrote:

Don't want to get in a brand slam, because each use their own technology, but I've always understood that Dodge benefits the most from a brake.

This is our 2001 7.3 Ford on its way over Wolf Creek as it did 3 times a year. Before I ever tried I figured I should get a brake, but it did much better than I originally expected so I never did install a brake and never missed it.


[image]


Same truck as mine, one of the big reasons I hang on to the old relic. Do have to say my sons 2008 dodge cummins with EB is sure nice, but not enough to get another truck with EB or add to mine.

Veebyes

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Posted: 03/01/14 10:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Done my share of mountain driving with a heavy trailer. No exhaust brake but I do slip into the 'manual' mode for long grades up or down. I don't like to hear the engine screaming at high RPM for any period so the method is to get into whichever gear is suitable for the grade then let it build up speed, brake down to a low speed, let it build again & so on.

Can't say that the smell of heated pads has never been experienced, but not very often.


Boat: 32' 1996 Albin 32+2, single Cummins 315hp
40+ night per year overnighter

2007 Alpenlite 34RLR
2006 Chevy 3500 LT, CC,LB 6.6L Diesel

Ham Radio: VP9KL, IRLP node 7995

cummins2014

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Posted: 03/01/14 10:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Veebyes wrote:

Done my share of mountain driving with a heavy trailer. No exhaust brake but I do slip into the 'manual' mode for long grades up or down. I don't like to hear the engine screaming at high RPM for any period so the method is to get into whichever gear is suitable for the grade then let it build up speed, brake down to a low speed, let it build again & so on.

Can't say that the smell of heated pads has never been experienced, but not very often.


Similar to what I do ,but I don't mind 3000 RPM with my old 7.3, so I usually stay in a lower gear, and that usually keeps me off the brake pedal for any length of time.

Did come off the hill going out of Ennis ,Montana into Virginia Ciy, Montana, going faster then I should of. Not a very long hill ,but pretty steep, got on the brakes more then I should of, and got the brakes pretty hot .

ol Bombero-JC

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Posted: 03/01/14 12:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If your transmission in your Ford is OK with an EB, go for it..[emoticon]
(Pre-2006 Ram stock *auto* transmissions are not).

Will it save "overall' brake wear = sure.

Is it *necessary* for mountain driving = No.

Use Common Sense = Yes.

Ex: 34' Fifth - about 12K weight loaded.
Eisenhower Tunnel (Loveland Pass, CO.) was having road work done, with height restrictions.
Detoured to "old" US 6. Descended westbound from 11,990 ft.

Geared down (in advance) when necessary - with very little braking needed.
Yeah - faster traffic passing, but no big deal.

~

MrVan

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Posted: 03/01/14 01:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Me Again wrote:

MrVan wrote:

We don't have exhaust brakes on our truck but would have it on any truck we purchased in the future. However, one can adjust your driving habits to fit the equipment you do have. On 6% down grades on the Interstates I just slip the truck into 2nd gear at the top of the grade and let the engine compression hold the load at 45 MPH. A form of a compression brake. On a long downhill grade of 6% I may have to hit the brakes two or three times for short periods to hold the 45 MPH maximum. I think it is safer than going down hill at a faster speed with compression brakes since the margin of error is less. YMMV.


I do not know what you drive, but stock my 2001.5 Dodge/Cummins/Auto would not lock the TC going down hill. Even with a manual, the Cummins engine just free wheels going down grades. For some unknown reason the Ford and GM V8's seem to hold back better with grade braking. I could fool the 47RE to lock the TC at the top of the hill with the cruise control, but it just was not effective.

I would not tow a mid to larger 5th wheel without an exhaust brake.

Chris


Ford F250 with 7.3L Diesel. 145,000 miles and still going strong.

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