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 > Snowbird tire shredding today

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empty_nest

Western New York

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Posted: 11/04/13 05:09am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

edatlanta wrote:

I check mine before I ever hook up even if I'm just driving around the block. Tires are something I absolutely do not ignore and they are replaced when they age out, which for me is no more than 5 years. Currently running my 5'er on 4 brand new G614's installed May 2013.

My brother in law thinks I'm crazy for replacing tires "with all that tread left". Of course he is the one who sent his wife off in their Suburban on a 2,000 mile trip a few years ago with the steel cord showing on one tire. "But it had plenty of tread and it was holding air".


I had 3 blowouts in one trip to SC earlier this year. Checked the tire pressure, good tread and no signs of weathering or cracking. What I didn't realize is that there is an age limit to these tires.

We bought the 5'r used and, as it turned out, those tires were 10 yrs old. Learned a tough lesson but we learned!


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Turbo Diesel Dude

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Posted: 11/04/13 06:08am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My DW who is the proverbial, original "tight xxx" when it comes to money would say, "damn, you just bought tires six years ago, why new ones?". LOL

* This post was edited 11/04/13 07:03am by an administrator/moderator *


charles weidman

Jack_Diane_Freedom

Milton Ontario Canada

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Posted: 11/04/13 06:29am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have had 2 blow outs on different trailers over the last 18 years and I am very strict about checking tires and pressures and tow at 100 km/hr. A TPMS would have told me nothing as both were just 'blam' and the gator chucked out to the side. Luckily no damage in either instance. I do hate changing a tire on the side of an expressway though.

powderman426

N. E. Ohio/The Villages, Fla

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Posted: 11/04/13 06:30am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Me Again wrote:

TPMS only catch about 50 percent of the tire problems before it is to late. The other fifth percent is just an alarm that the tire is in a million pieces.


Could you please give us a link to those statistics??


Ron & Charlotte
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Luke Porter

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Posted: 11/04/13 06:38am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

How do you know they were "blowouts" and not "flats"?


Yep, actually drove to all of these places---in the last eight years. Missed Rhode Island and New Jersey.


.


Me Again

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Posted: 11/04/13 07:34am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

powderman426 wrote:

Me Again wrote:

TPMS only catch about 50 percent of the tire problems before it is to late. The other fifth percent is just an alarm that the tire is in a million pieces.


Could you please give us a link to those statistics??


http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/811681.pdf Look at section:

6. Discission

In reading a bit about TPMS to respond to you, it is seem there are a few issues the industry is dealing with. Proper maintenance is being over looked and components are failing due to corrosion. Valve cores must be a special nickle plated ones. Aluminum parts are corroding in area where roads are treated with chemicals in the winter.

http://www.tirereview.com/Article/106844........s_tpms_sensor_corrosion_a_big_issue.aspx

I have seen posts by and talked to people that said they gave up on their system do due to sensor leaking issues.

The theory of TPMS is good, it is just a young child not fully developed. For car and trucks there is not yet standardization of sensor components and batteries.

People have to understand it is just one tool among many. Step one in a lot of cases is to switch to the best tires available for your trailer, and in a very high number of cases that is not the OEM low bid bean counter ones the manufacturer installed.

I would much rather run really high quality tires that have very low failure rates reported without a TPMS, than run cheap OEM tires with a TPMS. We all have to decide where to spend your hard earned dollars. I put mine first into tires. I was going to maybe buy a TPMS at my last trailer tire installation two years ago, however the tire shop did not have bolt in valve stems that would fix my aluminum wheels. Bad planning on my part!

Chris


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Atom Ant

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Posted: 11/04/13 08:06am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Me Again wrote:


I would much rather run really high quality tires that have very low failure rates reported without a TPMS, than run cheap OEM tires with a TPMS. We all have to decide where to spend your hard earned dollars. I put mine first into tires. I was going to maybe buy a TPMS at my last trailer tire installation two years ago, however the tire shop did not have bolt in valve stems that would fix my aluminum wheels. Bad planning on my part!

Chris


X2

powderman426

N. E. Ohio/The Villages, Fla

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Posted: 11/04/13 08:51am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Me Again wrote:

powderman426 wrote:

Me Again wrote:

TPMS only catch about 50 percent of the tire problems before it is to late. The other fifth percent is just an alarm that the tire is in a million pieces.


Could you please give us a link to those statistics??


http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/811681.pdf Look at section:

6. Discission

In reading a bit about TPMS to respond to you, it is seem there are a few issues the industry is dealing with. Proper maintenance is being over looked and components are failing due to corrosion. Valve cores must be a special nickle plated ones. Aluminum parts are corroding in area where roads are treated with chemicals in the winter.

http://www.tirereview.com/Article/106844........s_tpms_sensor_corrosion_a_big_issue.aspx

I have seen posts by and talked to people that said they gave up on their system do due to sensor leaking issues.

The theory of TPMS is good, it is just a young child not fully developed. For car and trucks there is not yet standardization of sensor components and batteries.

People have to understand it is just one tool among many. Step one in a lot of cases is to switch to the best tires available for your trailer, and in a very high number of cases that is not the OEM low bid bean counter ones the manufacturer installed.

I would much rather run really high quality tires that have very low failure rates reported without a TPMS, than run cheap OEM tires with a TPMS. We all have to decide where to spend your hard earned dollars. I put mine first into tires. I was going to maybe buy a TPMS at my last trailer tire installation two years ago, however the tire shop did not have bolt in valve stems that would fix my aluminum wheels. Bad planning on my part!

Chris


Nice Try, but no cigar.

That information is about passenger cars and light trucks equiped with a factory system and not the TPMS that we use on RV's. In reading the information I see that about 2/3 of all units only report with a warning light after a tire has lost more than 25% of proper pressure, does not indicate which tire has a problem, or give any indication of the tire overheating while a TPMS that we use gives a warning at 15% underinflation, which tire, and tire temperature. I fully argree on buying the best tires for your situation and that is why I bought Maxxis tires and moved up a load range at the same time. Will a TPMS save you every time?? I can't answer that but probably not. It can and has notified me of a problem after I picked up a 3/8" bolt in a tire and the only damage I had was to the tire unlike the time before that when a tire blew and took out all of my propane lines as well as a portion of the siding near the bottom. I fixed that damage myself, but I am sure if I were to take it into a repair facility it would have been well over $1000 so I am money ahead already. So the bottom line is I am a firm believer in a TPMS and also in favor of a quality CO detector as either of them may save you more than money. They may save your life.

Atom Ant

Denver, CO

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Posted: 11/04/13 09:12am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

powderman426 wrote:


Nice Try, but no cigar.

That information is about passenger cars and light trucks equiped with a factory system and not the TPMS that we use on RV's. In reading the information I see that about 2/3 of all units only report with a warning light after a tire has lost more than 25% of proper pressure, does not indicate which tire has a problem, or give any indication of the tire overheating while a TPMS that we use gives a warning at 15% underinflation, which tire, and tire temperature. I fully argree on buying the best tires for your situation and that is why I bought Maxxis tires and moved up a load range at the same time. Will a TPMS save you every time?? I can't answer that but probably not. It can and has notified me of a problem after I picked up a 3/8" bolt in a tire and the only damage I had was to the tire unlike the time before that when a tire blew and took out all of my propane lines as well as a portion of the siding near the bottom. I fixed that damage myself, but I am sure if I were to take it into a repair facility it would have been well over $1000 so I am money ahead already. So the bottom line is I am a firm believer in a TPMS and also in favor of a quality CO detector as either of them may save you more than money. They may save your life.


Where did carbon monoxide (CO) come into this? If you were trying to say combustible gas detector - wrong detector.

TPMS is detection - just like any other detection. It is only effective if you have done everything to eliminate the hazard first. Smoke detectors give early warning of fire, but the way to prevent fire is minimize the fire hazard. TPMS is great tire trouble detector, but to first minimize tire trouble, get a quality tire.

powderman426

N. E. Ohio/The Villages, Fla

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Posted: 11/04/13 10:28am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Atom Ant wrote:

powderman426 wrote:


Nice Try, but no cigar.

That information is about passenger cars and light trucks equiped with a factory system and not the TPMS that we use on RV's. In reading the information I see that about 2/3 of all units only report with a warning light after a tire has lost more than 25% of proper pressure, does not indicate which tire has a problem, or give any indication of the tire overheating while a TPMS that we use gives a warning at 15% underinflation, which tire, and tire temperature. I fully argree on buying the best tires for your situation and that is why I bought Maxxis tires and moved up a load range at the same time. Will a TPMS save you every time?? I can't answer that but probably not. It can and has notified me of a problem after I picked up a 3/8" bolt in a tire and the only damage I had was to the tire unlike the time before that when a tire blew and took out all of my propane lines as well as a portion of the siding near the bottom. I fixed that damage myself, but I am sure if I were to take it into a repair facility it would have been well over $1000 so I am money ahead already. So the bottom line is I am a firm believer in a TPMS and also in favor of a quality CO detector as either of them may save you more than money. They may save your life.


Where did carbon monoxide (CO) come into this? If you were trying to say combustible gas detector - wrong detector.

TPMS is detection - just like any other detection. It is only effective if you have done everything to eliminate the hazard first. Smoke detectors give early warning of fire, but the way to prevent fire is minimize the fire hazard. TPMS is great tire trouble detector, but to first minimize tire trouble, get a quality tire.


The CO alarm had nothing to do with this thread, but I felt the need to mention it as most RV's come with a cheap unit while having a decent one with a readout on it cost very little and may save your life.

Now as for the need for a TPMS vs good tires, I said and will reiterate it is best to get the best tires you can. But having the best tires does nothing for you when you pickup a piece of road debris like I did. So the bottom line is you don't have to take my advise but trust me when I say that if you travel long enough it will happen to you and then you can come back and say " Gee I should have listened to the old man."

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